Category: Interview

Actor, dancer, and singer-songwriter Matthew Morrison has won over audiences by stepping into the shoes of a bevy of characters on Broadway and on TV, most notably as Will Schuester on Glee. But he’s about to take on what may very well be his most exciting role yet: as a dad to his first child with wife Renee Morrison. But before the couple welcomes their baby in the fall, Morrison and photographer Zach Duffie have designed and debuted a new line of dad gear and accessories called Sherpapa Supply Co. In honor of the line’s launch, Morrison and Duffie—fast friends who met through their wives—curated favorite and exclusive clothes, bags, hats, and other items for a special partnership with Gilt.com.

Parents.com recently caught up with Morrison and Duffie at their launch party to chat about their inspiration for Sherpapa, the challenges of being a modern dad, and Morrison’s hopes and fears around fatherhood.

Sherpapa was originally inspired by the birth of Duffie’s daughter, who’s now 2. As “an outdoors kinda guy” and a stay-at-home (or, as he likes to put it, a “stay outside dad”), he says he realized there really weren’t baby bags or accessories made for him and fathers like him. “I started to talking to Matthew, and he was the one who pushed me into saying, ‘Hey, we really need to make this a reality, there’s people that need this,’” the photographer explains.

“He was saying, ‘There’s nothing out there for cool dads,'” Morrison shares with Parents.com exclusively. “I said, ‘Let’s roll with this.’ Nine months ago, we really put the pedal to the medal. It’s just been such a labor of love. It’s such a family business.”

Duffie and Morrison also very much see the line as more than “just products.” They’re also hoping that the brand will send a powerful, important message to other dads and dads-to-be.

“Being a dad, one of the most universal things, really, the stereotypes around it are kind of the dorky dad that kinda bumbles through,” Duffie acknowledges. “But now, both parents share the responsibilities of the day-to-day a lot more. We’re in a generation where both the husband and wife both work and they both share the responsibilities of raising the kids, and there are a lot of dads who just own it, who are on top of it, and there’s no lifestyle brand that really supports that. And we’re in a time where we really need strong family leaders, and there needs to be something for those guys.”

Morrison agrees that feeling prepared with the right diaper bag or other everyday items can positively affect modern dads’ morale. “We’re trying to really motivate dads to be present and proactive fathers, and give them the tools and the gear to feel like they’re ready for anything, because it is such a challenging job to be a parent, and we want to make it as easy as possible,” he notes.

And speaking of feeling prepared, this is, no doubt, a big year for Morrison—but he’s taking all of the major milestones in stride. “Obviously, I’m about to have a child, and it couldn’t have been more perfect timing,” he shares. “I’m about to go on the biggest adventure of my life, and I feel like this the first birth of the year—getting this company launched, and then we’ll have the next one!”

In the meantime, Morrison has certainly been thinking about what the big day of his child’s birth will look like. And like all expectant fathers, he admits he’s nervous.

“The thing I’m most terrified about is probably the actual birth,” he told Parents.com. “Because it’s so unpredictable, you know. But my dad is a midwife; he’s going to be there for the birth of our child. And I’ve grown up in that baby-birthing world, so I’m actually really ready for that. I feel like you get certain points of your life where you get to reset, and things just sort of start over, and I feel like this is one of those moments where I’m going to hit the reset button, and anything is possible. It’s a whole new world.”

Cheers to that—and to dads feeling even more prepared to take on that world.

Parents.com

This morning Paul Ross  of TalkRadio was joined by Glee star Matthew Morrison, who told us all about his amazing career and his very British interest.

As well as reflecting on his time in Glee, the American actor and dancer also revealed he’s a big fan of football.

Matthew also told us about the amazing experience of singing with Elton John, and revealed his thrill at starring in Grey’s Anatomy. He even found time to tell us about his show at the London Hippodrome and Casino this week.

Listen to the full interview above.

Source

Matthew on Loose Women
POSTED ON May 15, 2017 BY Valentina INInterview

FORMER GLEE STAR ADMITS FILMING GLEE TOOK ITS TOLL AFTER SIX YEARS ON THE SHOW

TV heartthrob Matthew Morrison has fond memories off filming hit musical TV show Glee – but reveals he’s glad it’s now come to an end.

The actor starred as Will Schuester from 2009 to 2015 but with success comes extra demands and consequently long hours.

He said: “We worked tirelessly. It was 16 hour days minimum. We did dance rehearsals, recorded the show, filmed it and did press alongside that so it was long, long hours.

“It was a great show. I really feel I was their teacher. A lot of the kids hadn’t done anything like that before and I’d done Broadway shows so in many ways I really was their teacher.”

ON DANCING AS A BOY GROWING UP

I found my passion at a young age. There were moments of insecurities but I was pretty athletic so I got away with it.

ON HIS WIFE

She is stunning, she is from Hawaii so we got married there. Eventually when we have kids they will have Hawaiian names. We want to follow that tradition. At our wedding she did a dance. It’s a tradition a woman ‘leis’ her man!

ON SEX SCENES

I have the most supportive wife. She tells me if I have a sex scene or kissing she she wants me to really go for it. She wants it to go right. They’re the weirdest things to film.

I had a sex scene with Cara Delevingne in a film recently. It’s always strange. Very choreographed, there’s a bunch of people watching and you’re naked.

ON HIS UPCOMING NEW LONDON SHOW

It’s three shows. I tell stories of my life. I’m so used to playing characters but this is a chance for the audience to really see Matthew Morrison. I go through a career retrospective of some shows I’ve been in from Glee to Hairspray.

Watch the clip on the Loose Women website.


He also helped celebrate host Saira Khan’s birthday.

Clip courtesy of Metro UK

 

Matthew Morrison has a Valentine’s Day date with Aspen.

“I’m singing from the standards, so there are a lot of great love songs in there,” Morrison said in recent phone interview from Los Angeles. “I’m excited to share the love.”

The song-and-dance man of Broadway, film and TV fame is performing with a jazzy five-piece band on a tour that comes to the Wheeler Opera House on Tuesday.

Morrison’s concerts offer a mix of material from his stage and screen career — from TV’s “Glee” and Broadway’s “Finding Neverland,” “Hairspray,” “South Pacific” — along with his charming spin on the classics of American song and some originals from his self-titled 2011 album.

“I always feel like I was born in the wrong era,” said Morrison, 38. “I love the standards and all they represent and the gorgeous storytelling they did back in the day.”

Morrison complements the crooning with a strong dance element in his concerts (“I’ll be strutting my stuff all over that stage”). The California native, who made his Broadway debut in “Footloose” and got his star turn as Link in “Hairspray,” has become one of the world’s leading musical theater actors, while also winning over the masses as teacher Will Schuester on the television show “Glee,” earning Emmy, Tony and Golden Globe nods along the way.

Morrison looks back on his time on “Glee” with pride.

“The further I get away from it, the more I realize how special it was,” he said. “I could have been on any show and played a cop or a lawyer or something, but this is a show that I actually played an inspirational teacher.”

The enormously popular and acclaimed “Glee” shifted the culture not only for musicals — it’s no stretch to say it helped pave the way for a pop culture landscape where “La La Land” is a frontrunner for a Best Picture Oscar and “Hamilton” is a once-in-a-generation phenomenon — but also moved the needle for gay rights and marriage equality.

“The way it spoke to the LGBT community, at a very important time in our history — I see a family sitting down and watching ‘Glee’ together and then they turn off the TV and they have a conversation about what they just saw,” Morrison reflected. “There was a lesson in every episode. For that, I’m truly grateful.”

Cutting his teeth on Broadway, where the eight-show-a-week grind tests the stamina of the most gifted of singers and actors, prepared Morrison for hitting the road as a solo act. The strength of his voice has earned him some challenging roles — playing J.M. Barrie in “Finding Neverland,” for example, he performed a dozen songs every night. So doing 15 or 16 on this national tour isn’t as daunting as it might be otherwise.

“I think Broadway is the best preparation for anyone doing anything,” he said. “All that training has built up my stamina to do something like this. … It’s what I was born to do. It’s my favorite thing to do.”

Touring with a catalog of throwback tunes scratches a creative itch that Morrison isn’t likely to lose, though he won’t resist the siren song of Hollywood.

“My love for the stage will always be there, that’s my number one place that I love to be,” Morrison said. “But at this point in my career, I feel like I want to be doing more in front of the camera. This is the heyday of television.”

From here, along with touring, Morrison hopes to continue being a part of what many have dubbed a “golden age” of television — he had a recurring role on the last season of “The Good Wife” and has more projects in the works. He’s also at work on producing and starring in an original Broadway musical and has been work-shopping Stephen Sondheim’s new “Bunuel.” On the big screen, fans can see Morrison in the costume drama “Tulip Fever,” due out next month.

Putting together a solo concert has also forced Morrison to play himself onstage — a relatively new role for the actor, and one he’s growing into.

“You can always hide behind a character,” he said. “With something like this, you have to trust yourself and know yourself and be confident. You can’t hide. That’s been therapeutic and it’s something I’ve learned to find great joy in.”

AspenTimes

Matthew Morrison will bring his extensive show-tune repertoire with him when he plays the Parker Playhouse on Feb. 17. But it’s the American songbook that’s his favorite.

“I love singing, and I love singing these standards,” Morrison says. “For me, that’s my wheelhouse and what I love to sing. Songwriting has become about having a cool beat. But [back then], music and lyrics were about telling a story. I love storytelling. I’m not just singing a song, I’m acting, as well. In some songs, I throw in a dance break as well. I try to give them the whole package.”

Morrison’s appearance is part of Seth Rudetsky’s Broadway Concert Series, in which stage stars are interviewed by Sirius XM radio host and Broadway expert Rudetsky. In the performances, Rudetsky prompts behind-the-scenes stories and accompanies the artists while they sing songs from their Great White Way repertoire.

And Morrison has plenty to draw from. On Broadway, he starred in “Footloose,” “The Rocky Horror Show” and “Hairspray.” He was nominated for a Tony Award for his 2005 performance in “The Light in the Piazza” and most recently headlined the 2015 Broadway run of “Finding Neverland.”

Here are excerpts from a recent interview.

Have you ever been to Fort Lauderdale?

I’ve never been to Fort Lauderdale. I’ve spent a lot of time in Miami. I travel there with the same group every New Year’s. We’ve also gone to places like Sydney, London. Last year, we were in Hong Kong. But we’ve spent a few New Year’s in Miami. I love staying at the Fontainebleu and going every place in Miami’s nightlife.

If you just did songs from “Glee” and your three albums, you’d fill up a whole show. Are there some career bookmarks that you think you and Seth must hit or reference?

Because the show is so loose, I would say no. He always gets to the big ones like “Hairspray” and “Glee.” One of his favorite shows is “Light in the Piazza,” so I’m pretty sure he’ll do that.

Is this format — chatting off the cuff and then singing a song — thrilling for you, or just plain scary?

I’m very meticulous with my performances, so these performances were always a little daunting to me only because I have no control because Seth is in the driver’s seat and I’m along for the ride. He’s quite funny. He has a great sense of humor. I find myself finding out a lot about myself in the questions he asks. He is very enlightening in that way.

What about the interview questions he asks onstage?

I rarely get scared about these, when it’s about my life. I mean, I should have the answers. I guess it’s more thrilling because he goes way, way back and asks things about childhood and some of the first performances I did. He kind of covers the grand scope of my life. It’s thrilling and nostalgic … going back and talking about the great moments and the hidden meanings. It’s like going to therapy almost.

By the time you were on “Glee,” you were already well known on Broadway. Describe the difference between being a star of the stage and being a star on television.

With “Glee,” when we shot the first 13 shows, we were in a bubble. None of them had even aired before we shot all 13. We lived sitting in this little bubble of innocence. We had no idea what to expect. I mean, at the end of the day, it was a show about singing and dancing high-school students and we didn’t know how it would be received. And then, the next thing I know, I’m sitting on Oprah’s couch. And I’m like, “Oh, wow. This is a different ball game.” That was the moment for me. When I go to different countries all over the world, I’m now recognized most of the time. They don’t know my name. It’s Mr. Schuester. That’s kind of fun. And I love it. I love that it was for a show that actually stood for something. The message of “Glee” was a message of acceptance. It was about the underdog rising up, and we hit a lot of social issues. I’d like to think that for some people it opened up the conversation [on topics like] being gay in high school, teen pregnancy, school shootings. I’m very glad we did that.

Matthew Morrison will perform 8 p.m. Feb. 17 at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE Eighth St., in Fort Lauderdale (in Holiday Park). Tickets cost $37-$123. To order, call 954-462-0222 or go to ParkerPlayhouse.com.

SouthFlorida.com

Exciting times for the California School of the Arts. Its new campus in the San Gabriel Valley opens in August. This Saturday, interested students will be allowed to preview its academic and arts programs, Matthew Morrison was with us to tell us more.

FoxLA


Brian Bowen Smith
Most people know Matthew Morrison as the young teacher Will “Mr. Schue” Schuester from the hit TV show “Glee.” But he’s also got a more classic set of influences.

“I’m just trying to emulate my idol, Gene Kelly,” he says. “I’m trying to bring back the modern song-and-dance man to our generation.”

Morrison, 38, is touring the country backed by a jazz band for an evening of standards and favorites, including a performance Saturday at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica. With his smooth tenor, the “versatile, hard-driving musical frontiersman,” as the New York Times pegs him, pulls from all the different work he’s done over the years.

The “retrospective show” includes an eight-minute medley of songs from the Broadway production of “Hairspray,” during which he runs through the entire story and some “Glee” moments, as well.

“Today’s music is all about coming up with a cool beat,” says Morrison, who splits his time between Los Angeles and New York. “With standards, the classic songwriters of the day would take music and lyrics and tell a story. That’s why I love these songs, because I get to put myself into different characters and really put on a show.”

As the only child of Army nurses, Morrison — who was born at Fort Ord, which closed in 1994 and reopened as Cal State Monterey Bay — discovered musical theater at age 10.

He was living in Orange County when his parents sent him to family in Arizona for the summer.

According to Morrison, “they didn’t really want to deal with me and my cousin so they threw us in a play.”

He was hooked.

After nearly a decade of children’s theater, Orange County High School of the Arts and New York University, he made his Broadway debut in “Footloose.” But his big break came when we was cast as heartthrob Link Larkin in the original Broadway production of “Hairspray.”

More recently he starred in the Broadway musical “Finding Neverland” and workshopped Stephen Sondheim’s next musical with the working title “Buñuel” after the Spanish director Luis Buñuel.

Though he’s most comfortable performing for a live audience, Morrison says he likes putting in time in front of the camera.

“These shows and concerts have really allowed me time to read a lot of scripts and go after what I want to do,” he says. “I don’t have to go and jump into a TV show that I don’t want to do because I need the money. It’s such a blessing on so many different levels.”

Look for him as a philandering drunkard in Tom Stoppard’s “Tulip Fever,” a period piece set in Amsterdam during the so-called “Tulip mania” of 1636, when the market for trading tulip bulbs soared to such large sums of money that it inevitably led to a spectacular crash of the Dutch economy.

The film’s star-studded cast includes Oscar winners Alicia Vikander, Christoph Waltz and Judi Dench. It arrives in theaters Feb. 24.

Pasadena Star News


©Brian Bowen Smith

From the moment Broadway and television star Matthew Morrison, as a kid, saw Gene Kelly on the silver screen, he knew what he wanted to do with his life.

“You’re either an Astaire guy or a Gene Kelly person. … Gene Kelly was the proletariat, the working man,” Morrison explains. “He was just such a man when he was dancing, and that’s what I wanted to emulate.”

The triple threat is adding a third act to his already thriving career with a series of solo concert engagements around the world, including one at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica.

For Morrison, it’s a chance to carry the torch of Kelly’s legacy into a more intimate and personal setting. While most solo Broadway concert gigs feature a performer singing their heart out on a stool, Morrison brings his signature hoofing into the act. “A big part of my show is dance,” he says.

Morrison rose to fame as the affable, inspiring choir teacher Will Schuester on Fox’s Glee, but theater and live performance have always been his first loves. “It’s like oxygen for me,” he says. Before and after the hit musical television show, Morrison made a career on the Broadway stage – originating the roles of Link Larkin in Hairspray and Fabrizio Naccarelli in The Light in the Piazza, and portraying the hunky, morally conflicted Lieutenant Cable in the Lincoln Center revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s South Pacific. Featuring songs from these career highlights, as well as many other jazz and Broadway standards, Morrison’s show tells the actor’s story through song (and dance). “My career is so diverse because I am not just a TV actor or a film actor or a Broadway actor,” he explains.

From South Pacific ballads to an eight-minute song-and-dance medley inspired by Hairspray, Morrison will span the gamut of his career in a mixture of song and dance accompanied by a jazz band (in other venues he’s joined by a symphony orchestra). “Honestly, the biggest appeal for me is being myself. Whenever I do other shows, I’m always playing a character,” he says. “I get to be myself and tell my stories. It’s just a real journey, and it’s my journey, so that’s something I like to share with people.”


©Brian Bowen Smith

The Broadway veteran likens the process of constructing his solo concert to the work of a stand-up comedian, from deciding on a concept for the arc of the show to perfecting the final version. “Like a stand-up comic, you’re constantly working your show, figuring out what works, what doesn’t, throw out this joke, add this one,” he says. “So it’s been a work in progress over the past year, really trying to hone it in.”

Morrison says he aims to create a show with a flexible and diverse range, working in up-tempo songs and never letting it sink under the weight of too many ballads. When it comes to choosing the songs themselves, he says he generally just selects his favorite and then adjusts the set list order to create a fluid performance. Many of the musicals he’s showcasing, including South Pacific and The Light in the Piazza, feature multiple solo numbers. In that case, Morrison says he selects the song that best suits his voice, rather than his favorite.

But there’s one song he can’t shake: My Fair Lady’s “On the Street Where You Live” has been his favorite song most of his life, growing and shifting with him. “That song is one of the first songs I ever sang at school, it’s the song that’s followed me my whole career,” he says. “I’ve sang it at almost every audition I’ve ever done. I booked Glee with that song. And the song has changed for me over the years. It used to be the young guy yearning … but now that I’m married, it’s become more like I’ve gone through the journey, and I will always remain here for you, being your rock.”

Morrison also tries to include songs or moments in his set that speak to each city where he’s performing. He hasn’t settled on what that will be for Los Angeles yet, but says it’s an issue of narrowing it down. His Los Angeles engagement is a homecoming of sorts. The actor grew up in Orange County, attending the renowned Orange County High School of the Arts, and he still leads a bicoastal life, maintaining a home in sunny L.A. “I just love being home here,” he says. “My home here really feels like a home. New York, it’s all apartment living, so it’s very tight quarters. It’s nice to actually walk around and have a nice big kitchen to cook in.”

While he’s thrilled to be back in his California home and in proximity to favorite restaurants and Runyon Canyon, Morrison is most excited to be able to do a live show that friends and family can attend: “It’s rare that I get to come back to Los Angeles. … A lot of friends are going to be able to see what I’ve been doing with my life for the past couple years.”

Morrison also has committed to giving back to his hometown. He regularly visits high schools and college campuses to teach master classes and answer students’ questions, particularly at his alma mater in Orange County. He is part of a group using the Orange County High School of the Arts as a model to open similar schools in the San Gabriel Valley and San Diego County. Morrison says they hope to expand to schools nationwide.

“I would not be where I am today if it wasn’t for the high level, high quality of teaching and learning that I got at that school,” he says. “I owe so much of my success to that school that I want to pay it forward and continue to reach out to the younger generation.” He fondly recalls when Broadway performer Susan Egan (she originated Belle in Disney’s theatrical production of Beauty and the Beast) came to his high school, and he got to dance with her. Morrison says he wants to pass along that experience to the next generation of performers and the reminder that at one time he was just like them, learning from Broadway greats and aspiring to be one. “I’m Mr. Schuester,” he jokes, “I’ve gotta keep the legend alive.”

Not only has Glee brought in a youthful audience to Morrison’s solo shows, but in general it has sparked a resurgence of interest in the Broadway musical. Thanks to cultural phenomenons such as Glee and Hamilton, musical theater is no longer languishing in the shadows as a niche interest. Morrison says he hasn’t noticed it from the inside of the process (“It’s the same experience being a performer”), but that box office numbers and the general interest in musicals has increased. “It’s a great time for Broadway,” he says, “but, on the inside, I feel like it’s still the same tight-knit, great community.”

Morrison hopes his concerts help perpetuate interest in both musical theater and the Great American Songbook. “It was the height of storytelling,” he says. “Today with music, a lot of people are just trying to come up with a cool beat. … We’ve lost that true songwriting in a lot of ways. Back then, it was so simple. You take music and lyrics, and you tell a story, and that was the basis of everything.”

When your concert is about telling your life story, it’s helpful to have a set list that does it for you. “It’s so easy to sing these songs because I really fall into the acting of them,” he says. “They’re so easy to act because they’re really just great stories. When I hear a standard, I almost don’t want the song to end because I just want the story to keep going.”

When it’s Morrison telling the story, it’s hard not to feel the same way.

Matthew Morrison at the Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica; Sat., Jan. 14, 7:30 p.m.; $75-$115. thebroadstage.com.

LA Weekly

HQ Pictures in the Gallery

Matthew Morrison learned long ago to be prepared for every performance, but there’s only so much he can do when he’s not exactly sure what’s going to happen when he shares the stage with Seth Rudetsky at the Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall on Thursday.

Morrison is best known for major roles in the Broadway musicals “The Light in the Piazza,” “Hairspray,” “South Pacific” and, most recently “Finding Neverland,” and he earned an army of fans as Will Schuester, the teacher who resurrects the long-abandoned high school glee club on the hit series “Glee.” He also had a recurring role on the final season of “The Good Wife” and has earned Tony, Emmy and Golden Globe award nominations for his roles.

Rudetsky might be dubbed “Mr. Broadway.” He has played keyboards in the orchestra of numerous musicals, been an accompanist for countless stars in concerts, is an arranger, Playbill columnist, blogger and the co-creator of last season’s Tony-nominated musical “Disaster.” A former writer for Rosie O’Donnell’s daytime talk show, he’s also one of the main hosts of the Sirius XM Broadway channel, and has twice come to Sarasota to help the Van Wezel announce its Broadway series.

The Van Wezel concert will be a low-key affair, with Rudetsky accompanying the song and dance man, and interviewing him in between songs.

“It’s nerve-wracking and fun because I don’t know what to expect,” Morrison said. “I’m usually very methodical with my shows and how to lay them all out and talking points. This is more off the cuff and does add an element of surprise and gets my nerves going and I like that. It makes me feel alive.”

For Rudetsky, it’s just another day on the job. He frequently interviews the creators and performers of Broadway shows on his radio programs.

Rudetsky said that Morrison will perform songs from his Broadway shows, among other songs, and in between “I’ll ask him questions about the shows, and stories that I’ve heard about. I have no idea where we’re going to go. I’m very interested myself in knowing the answers. I love Broadway history. It’s going to be like the audience is hanging out with us in our living room, talking about whatever I want to talk about.”

Rudetsky said the format, which he’s done with such artists as Patti LuPone, Betty Buckley and Andrea Martin, helps keeps the programs light and spontaneous and also gets the singers to open up.

“A lot of people don’t like talking about themselves, but they need to appreciate their own careers as they’re talking, they’ll realize that it’s so cool that I experienced that.”

Morrison said that “Glee” changed the trajectory of his career. Before that Fox series had its debut, “if you didn’t live in the New York community, you probably didn’t know who I was, whereas now with ‘Glee’ being such a huge international show, you’re traveling all over the world and people are recognizing you. I’m just so happy as an actor. ‘Glee’ was so special in a moment in our history and it changed peoples’ lives. It taught a lot about bullying. People could connect to some of the characters, the messages were so strong, and it was so special to be part of something that was monumental and really had an effect on people.”

The Herald Tribune

A pained frown raced along Matthew Morrison’s brow. This wasn’t the terrorized expression of horror we recall from the hit TV show “Glee” when his Mr. Schuester was under attack by his archenemy gym coach played by Jane Lynch. Nor the exaggerated, fierce scowl he sported recently on a Broadway stage, clashing with Kelsey Grammer’s Captain Hook in “Finding Neverland.”

No, this was the resigned look of the weary homeowner realizing more bills are on the way. Morrison, 38, was back from the Chelsea neighborhood in Manhattan, where he and wife Renee also live, to his cozy compound in the Hollywood Hills. First, the driveway’s electronic gate was being balky, and now the front door latch was proving uncooperative.

These annoyances morphed the frown to grumbling: “Boy, go away a little bit and everything crumbles.”

Morrison plopped down on a comfy leather couch, stretched his legs out onto a coffee table and pushed aside repair thoughts to chat about a bit of everything, which seems suitable given his 15-year career is equal parts acting, singing and dancing.

Morrison has a number of pots boiling. Last year he filmed a role in “Tulip Fever,” a Tom Stoppard-written period romance with Oscar winners Alicia Vikander, Judi Dench and Christoph Waltz slated to open Feb. 24. In late November, he workshopped numbers in the eagerly awaited Stephen Sondheim musical, working title “Bunuel.” (“Melodies are so ungeneric, challenging, I couldn’t sleep the night before singing my parts,” he said.) Fingers crossed, that will open at the Public Theater in New York in the fall.

Meantime, his focus is on touring show in which he sings Broadway standards with a backing jazz band. It stops Jan. 14 at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica and March 4 at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.

“My arrangements are organized so I can dance, a bit different than contemporary people like [Michael] Buble and [Josh] Groban who sing this kind of music,” Morrison said during a recent interview (edited for length), our first since our conversation for a Times Q&A published during the first season of “Glee” in 2010.

The 24-7 public attention you got in the first year or two when “Glee” blew up: a blessing or a curse?

Yes, [laughs] both. But that was fine. I kind of live in an emotional 5, I’m an even-keeled guy.

During the peak, would people react as if you were that character?

Oh, yeah. Once I was waiting to go into a restaurant and these kids came up and started singing, auditioning on the spot. And then they were, “So, can we be on ‘Glee?’” I gave them a bit of the Mr. Schu pep talk, but it was awkward. How do you say, “I play a fictional character on a TV show, I don’t cast it”?

I gotta know, what was the song?

[The slightest of frowns returned to his brow.] Ah, pretty sure it was “Don’t Stop Believing.” [Laughs] Yep, I got that one a lot.

You had done Broadway, but that show established you nationally.

And I am so proud of it! I could have been on a cop or lawyer show that hit, but “Glee” actually stood for something, legitimately meant more to real kids, like those I went to school with [at an arts high school].

“Glee” had a significant part of the gay rights movement, its surging among younger people, letting them feel more confident to be themselves in public.

You attended the Orange County School of the Arts in Santa Ana. Looking back 20 years, what did that give you?

A big thing was being in a school where everyone there wanted to be there — not just going because they had to go or learn to get an A and then forget stuff. People there applied learning in real time, so they were growing and changing. And so did I.

You are now on the school’s board?

Yes, it’s a mission of mine. I feel it is a perfect model of a charter school for the arts. Next year we are opening one in the San Gabriel Valley, and then we are looking to be in San Diego. We’re exploring doing about three in Northern California down the road, hopefully making this a national thing.

You’ve anchored an hour-long TV show and been the lead in a Broadway musical. What have you learned about sizing up projects that come your way?

[At first] it was, “It’s a part, I want any part!” After I had done a couple musicals, I was more looking at the roles — “Does this work for me? What do I get to do? Can I act, sing and dance?”

Now when a project comes up, I look at the team. Are they people likely to put something good together? Because I have been a part of some projects — sorry, no names — that didn’t really have a good leader or weren’t shaped right or the dynamics were off, and the results showed, I felt.

Now you have more control?

I do concerts, like these ones coming up, all over the world, and I am able to make a nice income so I don’t have to do just any show to pay the bills. I turn down more things than I accept.

That said, is there any specific role you would crawl over glass to play?

Gene Kelly!

In the day, people seemed to be either Fred Astaire fanciers — he was suave and smooth — or fans of Gene Kelly, more physical and rambunctious. How did you compare them?

Astaire felt a little high class for me. It was “tails.” Gene was the proletarian working man, average guy, you know? And I think I fell in love with Kelly because maybe I could be like him: I sing, act, dance. He excelled at all of them.

Beyond the obvious “Singin’ in the Rain,” is there a Kelly movie that especially knocks you out?

I love “An American in Paris,” but a dance routine that blows me away was in the movie “Summer Stock.” There was a creaking board and then a newspaper on the floor, and he tears it with his feet. It gets smaller and smaller, so effective and simple. Now, talking about it, I want to go watch it again!

Can you tell us about a song you are likely to sing live in these shows, why it matters to you?

There is a sense of longing to “On the Street Where You Live” that makes it special. But the song has changed meanings for me over my lifetime.

How so?

I sang it in high school and I auditioned with it in New York for many things. It was the song I got “Glee” with. But it really changed for me after I got married. In the past, it was so in the present for me — I was wooing, walking down the road with different women — but now it has a reflective, almost past tense feeling: I always walked down the path that led me to you, my wife. I will always stay here, be true to you, with you.

Do you have any nonentertainment professional pursuits?

I have gotten involved in an online business officially rolling out in June for Father’s Day. It is called Sherpapa. We are creating and selling what we think of as high quality “field kits” for younger dads who travel with their families. A parka kit, a beach kit, an airplane kit, just grab your quality-gear little kit and go.

How did this come to be?

Renee and I love traveling. We are friends with another travel-hungry couple who just had a kid and we were lamenting the challenges of being a “dad adventurer.” We hit on the name, in part from a Sherpa guiding, leading the way, plus, also the person carrying all the stuff, which often falls on dad.

All this talk of dads: Is fatherhood in your future?

We’re actively pursuing it. I am so looking forward to that next phase.

You are an only child. Do you want just one or more?

Family is so important so I would want there to be a sibling. Two, I think, but I want it manageable. I think we could handle that. [Pauses, then laughs.] I better check this is the right answer.

————

Matthew Morrison

Where: The Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica

When: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 14

Tickets: $75-$115 (subject to change)

Information: (310) 434-3200, www.thebroadstage.com

LA Times/Pictures: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times
HQ images in the gallery

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